Resurrected Entertainment

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R.I.P. Game Guides

September 13, 2021

I have been playing Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla lately on the PlayStation 5 and I noticed that there were no official game guides for it on Amazon. I thought this was odd since there are many things to find and unravel within the game which would surely be enough content to warrant a guide. Some time later, I visited the in-game store and found all kinds of downloadable patches that could alter the game and give you content that you would typically find in a game guide, such as location maps for items and such. Obviously, this is the reason why there are no official guides, since Ubisoft wanted to leverage the power of in-app purchasing and make money directly off of these hints, rather than split the profit with the publisher for the guide. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a good strategy and I don’t necessarily disagree with it, even if it costs me more money. The in-game location maps for Vahalla, which could have built-in filters and search features, deliver a better experience than having to flip through pages of a game guide. Naturally, it is a bit of a balancing act, since many gamers want to feel like they own the complete experience for a game once they pay the sticker price. If some content feels like it should have been part of the official release and not as a separate download that must be purchased later, then the model has crossed that line. There are several games available that follow that model to its inevitable conclusion, where the core game is free, but any additional features or content that presumably make the game more interesting, must be purchased separately.

Happy birthday to the Legend of Zelda development team!

August 22, 2021

Unusually, the release date for this game in North America appears to be under some debate with some sources listing it as being released in June, July, or August. I chose the latter since it was the only entry listed with a specific day. The Japanese release was in February 1986, over a year earlier.

Before this game, I had played text adventures, Dungeons and Dragons over e-mail, and one or two “RPG adventure” titles on the Atari 2600. I have long been fascinated with the genre as RPG elements and action are two of my favorite themes in a video game.

Playing Deadlight on the PC

April 1, 2020

I have been enjoying Deadlight on the PC. It’s a beautiful little action platformer with relatively simple mechanics, albeit with a frustrating mechanism when shooting and loading a pistol. It’s simple to shoot, but difficult to get the aim right. Luckily, most targets are large and relatively easy to hit. I hope there isn’t an upcoming situation where I need to shoot something in a hurry…

While reading some comments about the game the other day, it seems a lot of people had difficulty around the helicopter scene. Based on the comments, they seemed to found the difficulty spike to be out of the blue, to the point where the shock of it caused many of them to stop playing the game cold turkey. They just aborted it, claiming the scenario was unreasonably challenging. The thing is, I found it tricky too, but only for a short while. I needed to try it several times before I finished it. The point is that I did get through it, even when I screwed up one section royally and thought for sure I was a goner. Just to prove it wasn’t a fluke, I tried it again and completed it with no issues.

The comments in the thread seem a little too caustic, given the games average difficulty level. I am left wondering about the psychology at play here. If a game has established an easy to moderate level of difficulty, and then it bumps the difficulty up a few notches out of the blue, what does that do to the player’s opinion of the game? Are they statistically more likely to drop the game at this point? Do the majority push through these hiccups? Are players nowadays just a tad spoiled in our expectations around the difficulty of a game, once our notions about a title have been established?

Dead Space on PC

March 28, 2020

I finally had an opportunity to play and finish Dead Space for the PC. I had a lot of fun playing this game, and while the camera took some time to get use to and the VSYNC bug that took some time to diagnose, neither detracted measurably from the overall game play experience. I am not going to do a review on this game since the world doesn’t need another one of those. What I have been thinking about, though, is giving you a persona based list of key gaming elements that may help you decide if you want to play it:

  • Jumping about in 3D space doesn’t make you queasy (you will literally be jumping about in space with no gravity).
  • You like being told what to do and bossed around.
  • You can continue to snack while walking through pools of blood and guts.
  • You like games that allow you to kill things with visceral tools like bolt guns, saws, and fire.
  • You like it when you are low on ammo and there are baddies around the corner.
  • Detailed space ship environments make you happy.
  • You enjoy long load times as it gives you an opportunity to reflect on how you buggered it all up.

Playing Chrono Trigger cartridge on the SNES!

February 17, 2020

My wife is enjoying this great game using our Analogue console on the big screen. I love this new take on hardware for such a classic console.

Just plain old “Wolfenstein” on the PlayStation 3?

January 11, 2020

wolfenstein_ps3_small I picked up this used game on Amazon the other day for a steal. I had no idea it even existed before I stumbled upon it being mentioned in one of my favourite game magazines, Retro Gamer. Anyway, I am currently playing Wolfenstein: The Old Blood on my PC and loving it, but perhaps not quite as much as Wolfenstein: The New Order, we shall soon see how it stacks up as I get closer to finishing it!

Kill Two Cacodemons, Once a Day

January 20, 2019

I am ashamed to admit that I don’t play every game I own. Some of them haven’t even been fired up a single time on the machine for which they were destined to be played. Why is that?

Well, the easy answer is that I buy too many games for my current life style, and that is definitely true. I just don’t have as much free time as I had before I had kids. However, that answer doesn’t sit quite so well with me. It doesn’t feel like enough of a reason. I know that if I dedicated all of my free time towards the effort, I could play most, if not all, of those titles. It would take time, but I could slog through them. So then, why don’t I just do that?

The more complex answer is that I find many types of games I own to be mentally exhausting. I do tend to gravitate to the ones involving a lot of action and little else because of that. I just can’t bring myself to face the onslaught of constant decision making most of the time. I do play those other types of games, and I will enjoy them to varying degrees, but I find the exercise of unwinding a little harder than  when playing a game like Doom. The fact that I play these games at all is ironic, because I often partake in electronic games to unwind.

With games like Doom, it comes down to a constant cycle of challenge, failure, and success. I have a job and home life where I am challenged with all sorts of problems on a daily basis. That reality is stressful, and I often feel like I make very little progress in the day to day. When I play a game like Doom, it is challenging and I do fail often, but I also succeed multiple times as well. I don’t get that kind of tight cycle in a game like Divine Divinity, the cycle is much slower. With Doom or perhaps a good platformer, those short, micro wins are fulfilling. Sure the mental onslaught of fear, anger, and worry while playing these sorts of titles is tiring eventually, but at the end of it I have usually made significant progress and that progression is enjoyable and ultimately, worth the price of admission.

The first week

January 13, 2019

For some people, the hardest part of any project is just getting started. There are many reasons why this can be the case, but for me, here are the two areas where I normally get stuck:

  • Priorities – I have a family. I have many hobbies. Deciding what to focus on in the latter bucket and how to juggle that with the former is a challenge, and perhaps it is my biggest challenge when it comes to starting a new project. Deciding to focus on one thing and the expense of other things can be very difficult, especially when your project gets hard, or when a bright shiny object comes into view. Keeping your goals realistic is probably the single best rule worth following. Plan for a singular, specific goal, and then try to manage your time around that. For example, today I had the goal of getting my development environment setup and fixing a sample project to help get me started on my journey of building a small game in Love2D for my kids. As with any game, there are many steps, but I am not concerned about those at this point.
  • Analysis Paralysis – It can be difficult to choose the right tools and technologies for a project. The reason behind the analysis is clear, but the cause of the paralysis is usually because I don’t know enough about the tools, technologies, or the project itself to make a decision. In this case, I suggest just jumping in and try to decide on one or two evaluation points, where you can take a step back and try to take what you have learned and apply it against what you have yet to build. Do you see any major problems with the tools and technologies you have chosen going forward? Do you need to make a pivot towards something else?

Beelink Gemini N41 as a simple gaming console?

I took a chance on this little Windows computer to solve a couple of problems:

  • I needed a portable Windows game platform
  • I needed something small with an appropriate number of USB ports (for joystick support)
  • I wanted it to be quiet with very few zero fans whirring and humming

Right out of the gate, I was impressed with this machine. Forget about gaming for a second, this is an excellent machine for those wanting a Windows “desktop” computer without wanting or needing a large machine or laptop. This machine is so small you could easily attach it to the back of most monitors. It has friendly set-up process that everyone in your family should be able to follow with little difficulty (assuming they’ve touched a Windows computer in the last 5 years). The performance is excellent for those wanting to do a little e-mail, web browsing, etc. I have an interest in using it for games, but nothing 3D or with extremely heavy weight processing requirements.

Beelink-N41_small

TurboGrafx 16 Homebrew SD Card

May 27, 2017

turbo-everdrive-v24A new device graces my doorstep yesterday: the Turbo Everdrive! For years, I have been using an old device that allowed me to load up home-brew software for the TG-16 via a parallel cable, and old version of Windows, and some obsolete software. With this new device, I can now simply copy the software onto the SD card and away I go. If you get the same device, be aware that it comes pre-set for a PCE device and not a TG-16 game console, so you will simply see a white screen until you toggle the tiny little switch on the right of the card. Also note, that you will need to create a “TGED” directory at the root of the SD card with the device’s operating system file copied into it.